conserving habitat
conserving habitat
for the benefit of birds
conserving habitat
for the benefit of birds
other wildlife
conserving habitat
for the benefit of birds
other wildlife
and people
conserving habitat
for the benefit of birds
other wildlife
and people
conserving habitat
for the benefit of birds
other wildlife
and people
conserving habitat
for the benefit of birds
other wildlife
and people
conserving habitat
for the benefit of birds
other wildlife
and people
conserving habitat
for the benefit of birds
other wildlife
and people
100%

Sound Science

100%

Partnership Approach

100%

Habitat Projects

What We Do

The CIJV is a “habitat-based” Joint Venture working to achieve healthy bird populations by ensuring sufficient quantity and quality of habitat through conservation, restoration and management. These actions are supported by science, policy and outreach activities. The CIJV currently focuses on wetlands, lakes and rivers, riparian areas and grasslands. Although these habitat types cover only a small portion of the landscape, they support an extremely high diversity of birds, including 16 species that are considered at risk under Canada’s Species at Risk Act, and are under the greatest threat.

Research scientist Pascal Badiou, in prairie marsh.Securement

Partners work to secure key natural breeding habitats that are at high risk of loss or degradation. Habitat may be secured through purchase or donation, permanent conservation covenants or long term landowner agreements. Secured properties are managed for the benefit of wildlife. Compatible commercial and recreational uses (e.g., ecologically sensitive grazing) may be permitted where they do not conflict with wildlife values.

Restoration

Partners engage in restoration activities on high-value sites that have been degraded. For example, partners may work to restore natural water flows and flooding cycles (e.g., wetlands and riparian areas), remove invasive species or install fencing to control livestock access to sensitive areas.

Stewardship

Stewardship programs focus on changing broad land use for the benefit of birds and bird habitat. Examples include promoting the voluntary adoption of agricultural practices which are better for wetlands, or grazing systems that maintain healthier grasslands and benefit grassland birds.

Mack Pair Survey 2014Science

Monitoring programs enable partners to track local, regional and national bird populations. Partners also engage in targeted research to gather information that addresses specific issues around conservation activities in the region.

Policy

Partners encourage governments of all levels to support conservation and protect sensitive ecosystems. Policy activities are non-confrontational and informed by science.

Outreach

Partners engage in public outreach and education though a variety of means, including citizen science programs, various publications and educational and interpretive signage at project sites, to raise awareness of birds and their conservation needs.

Our Partners

Contact Us

Tasha Sargent
CIJV Coordinator
ec.pccb-bcjv.ec@canada.ca